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#1
If you are selling or buying ANYTHING online, you need to be on the lookout for internet scammers. These are people who pretend to be selling an item that they do not actually have, or that they want to purchase an item that you are selling.

It always ends up that they get your money and you get nothing. The first examples of internet scammers started several years back with what is called the Nigerian Scam. This involved getting an email from someone who claimed to be a disinherited person from the royal family and they had $35 million dollars ( could be more or less, depending on the email), and they desperately needed to get the money out of the country right away because the government was going to seize it.

They said they picked you because you were a person of great honesty and good character, and they want to send the money to you for safe-keeping, and in return you would receive part of the money; Of course, they wanted all of your bank account information, which some people were fooling enough to give them, and then had their bank accounts wiped out.

One of the more popular ones now is to simply make an advertisement, say for a house for rent, and it shows a picture of a beautiful house and an impossibly low rent. The owner is “out of town”; so you are to drive by and look and then send a deposit for the house if you like it, and they will send you the key.

Another version of that is the expensive purebred dog that is free if you send money for shipping. I am sure that there are a lot more incarnations of this scam. The reverse version of this is when you are advertising something for sale. They offer to purchase it and will send you the money, plus shipping costs, once they have your bank account, address, and other personal information.

Anytime you are buying or selling anything online, it is important to carefully read everything, and if it sounds too good to be true, it very likely is a scam.
 
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#2
If you are selling or buying ANYTHING online, you need to be on the lookout for internet scammers. These are people who pretend to be selling an item that they do not actually have, or that they want to purchase an item that you are selling.

It always ends up that they get your money and you get nothing. The first examples of internet scammers started several years back with what is called the Nigerian Scam. This involved getting an email from someone who claimed to be a disinherited person from the royal family and they had $35 million dollars ( could be more or less, depending on the email), and they desperately needed to get the money out of the country right away because the government was going to seize it.

They said they picked you because you were a person of great honesty and good character, and they want to send the money to you for safe-keeping, and in return you would receive part of the money; Of course, they wanted all of your bank account information, which some people were fooling enough to give them, and then had their bank accounts wiped out.

One of the more popular ones now is to simply make an advertisement, say for a house for rent, and it shows a picture of a beautiful house and an impossibly low rent. The owner is “out of town”; so you are to drive by and look and then send a deposit for the house if you like it, and they will send you the key.

Another version of that is the expensive purebred dog that is free if you send money for shipping. I am sure that there are a lot more incarnations of this scam. The reverse version of this is when you are advertising something for sale. They offer to purchase it and will send you the money, plus shipping costs, once they have your bank account, address, and other personal information.

Anytime you are buying or selling anything online, it is important to carefully read everything, and if it sounds too good to be true, it very likely is a scam.
It is funny that you mentioned this as @DigitalGlobal told me that he received a check for $1000 in the mail two weeks ago with very little explanation on the statement; He took the check which was from Pop money to the bank, and they could not find anything suspicious with the check so he deposited the check into his account. DG also said that he does not use pop money, which so happens to be what the bank uses also, however, the bank could not find any reasons on why the check was sent, and they could not find any red flags by depositing the check. I have not heard back from DG to see if the check was legit or if he had bounced, so I am just assuming there were no other issues with the check.
 

DigitalGlobal

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#3
It is funny that you mentioned this as @DigitalGlobal told me that he received a check for $1000 in the mail two weeks ago with very little explanation on the statement; He took the check which was from Pop money to the bank, and they could not find anything suspicious with the check so he deposited the check into his account. DG also said that he does not use pop money, which so happens to be what the bank uses also, however, the bank could not find any reasons on why the check was sent, and they could not find any red flags by depositing the check. I have not heard back from DG to see if the check was legit or if he had bounced, so I am just assuming there were no other issues with the check.
I was not going to say anything, so thanks, ROFL...
Anyways, I recently got an email from the bank saying that I had registered pop money on my account, which was not true, so I took the statement, and email to the bank, and they sent it to the home office, and I did not realize how ignorant banks are. I asked the bank employee several basic questions concerning account security, and she had no answers for me. How can a bank employee not answer questions on services the bank provides? Just a few days prior, I had sent the bank an email and said they need to do better with security by implementing two step verification, and what was their response on this? ZERO! This forum has a two-step verification option to protect owner accounts, so why would any bank not have this important security feature for their clients? After leaving the bank; I can safely say that I have ZERO confidence that the bank can safely guard and protect my bank accounts, and they do business with pop money which appears to be very popular with scammers, and if the bank does not come back with some reasonable explanation for the check, then I may have no choice other then to have my accounts shut down, then open new accounts, which is always a hassle I have to contact other companies that take money out automatically each month.
 
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#4
Admittedly there's a lot of online scams and through experience I have collected some guidelines and tips to know if an app, site, person is out to scam me.
1. Receiving Emails from unknown persons and companies which claims: A. Inheritance
B. Needs help in wiring or withdrawing money.
C. Promoting their full proof "System" in making money.
D. When someone uses the words "My Dear" or "Deary" whatever that means.
E. A very long email which is used for brainwashing. Don't read long emails, they always end up explaining that you have to pay something.

😎If you receive emails like that then automatically delete it and block the sender. There's so much more but I'll discuss it in another post.😎

2. YouTube Videos which claims that certain sites and apps can make you money. There are some YouTube channels that do promote legitimate sites but most do not.

A. They just want to trick you into clicking like and the subscribe button.

B. They just want you to click the link and register so that they would earn
through the sites affiliate program or referral program. This is normal if what was explained in the video is true and correct, sadly though most are just made-up to entice people to hit the link, signup and use the site. Doing this has adverse effects on the sites credibility and is always the fault of the marketer at the end of the day businesses would not be liable because another person promoted it.

😎Don't Like, Don't Subscribe until what was said has been proven effective😎

I'll discuss more on my next post.
 
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#5
There's a lot of Scam Sites around, we all have heard or has taken time to answer an online survey, there's a lot of Market Research companies who are tapping the online population to answer Market Surveys and to do Manual Verification tasks. I'm going to discuss Market Survey Scams.

3. Market Survey - I first experienced answering Market Surveys a couple of decades ago, I received an email and I registered, answered and finished several questions, earned points and after 9 months, I had enough points to exchange for cash, I was logged off and my account suddenly vanished, I complained and they gave me back my account empty, with no points. After sometime I tried another and another and to no avail all were scams, to think that these sites became big sites over the years and are still existing now. Although there's also a lot of survey sites that pays respondents but again its only good as an online extra income, my maximum earnings per legit survey site is only about $5 per month and I only have 2 sites now.

A. Don't even bother answering a Survey from a survey site which has a high withdrawal threshold, anything more than $10 is a scam in my experience.

B. Survey sites which promises a registration bonus if you give them a high rank or if you post a good review or share their site to your social media. It's definitely a scam site.

C. Companies that often logs you out and gives you problems in logging in even if you entered the correct username and password.

The best thing to do is to look for an international or global market Research site which has multiple offices worldwide and better if it has an office in your own country.
Sites like AIP Rakuten and Nielsen are trustworthy and proven companies.

To be Cont.
 

Hova

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#6
If a website suffers from poor design or multiple pop-up windows, more often than not that website is not legit and it is wise to stay away from it. Also never click on hyperlinks that are often sent through emails and come with instructions of about how you fill in personal information.
 

KellyGeo

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#7
If you are selling or buying ANYTHING online, you need to be on the lookout for internet scammers. These are people who pretend to be selling an item that they do not actually have, or that they want to purchase an item that you are selling.

It always ends up that they get your money and you get nothing. The first examples of internet scammers started several years back with what is called the Nigerian Scam. This involved getting an email from someone who claimed to be a disinherited person from the royal family and they had $35 million dollars ( could be more or less, depending on the email), and they desperately needed to get the money out of the country right away because the government was going to seize it.

They said they picked you because you were a person of great honesty and good character, and they want to send the money to you for safe-keeping, and in return you would receive part of the money; Of course, they wanted all of your bank account information, which some people were fooling enough to give them, and then had their bank accounts wiped out.

One of the more popular ones now is to simply make an advertisement, say for a house for rent, and it shows a picture of a beautiful house and an impossibly low rent. The owner is “out of town”; so you are to drive by and look and then send a deposit for the house if you like it, and they will send you the key.

Another version of that is the expensive purebred dog that is free if you send money for shipping. I am sure that there are a lot more incarnations of this scam. The reverse version of this is when you are advertising something for sale. They offer to purchase it and will send you the money, plus shipping costs, once they have your bank account, address, and other personal information.

Anytime you are buying or selling anything online, it is important to carefully read everything, and if it sounds too good to be true, it very likely is a scam.
Caution is always advised when dealing with anyone online especially when dealing with a total stranger whom you probably met on social media. Chances of such person being a scammer is very high especially if he or she brings up money related issues. They are never to be trusted.

There are lots of strategies being used by these scammers to dupe and fraud innocent people of their money. If I haven't wiped one mail that I received which was of the same scam pattern, I would have copied and pasted it here.

My experience was actually from a girl who I doubt if it was actually a girl. She sent me friend's request on Facebook and started chatting me up. I responded to her a few times and one day she asked if I have an iPhone which I said no. She promised to send me one. It took 3 days and she came back with some pictures of both an iPhone, a laptop and one jewelry. She told me that she would be sending all to me using UPS, that I should send my email which I did but I was simply playing along to catch her at her scheme.

She later sent me some screen shots that the items have already been sent and few days later, I got a mail that my package has arrived, instructing me to call one number being an Emirates airways customer service. I did and was told to pay some money to come pick up my item or have it delivered to my destination. Then I opened up and confronted the guy and he ended the call and barred me from calling him back.
 
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#8
Caution is always advised when dealing with anyone online especially when dealing with a total stranger whom you probably met on social media. Chances of such person being a scammer is very high especially if he or she brings up money related issues. They are never to be trusted.

There are lots of strategies being used by these scammers to dupe and fraud innocent people of their money. If I haven't wiped one mail that I received which was of the same scam pattern, I would have copied and pasted it here.

My experience was actually from a girl who I doubt if it was actually a girl. She sent me friend's request on Facebook and started chatting me up. I responded to her a few times and one day she asked if I have an iPhone which I said no. She promised to send me one. It took 3 days and she came back with some pictures of both an iPhone, a laptop and one jewelry. She told me that she would be sending all to me using UPS, that I should send my email which I did but I was simply playing along to catch her at her scheme.

She later sent me some screen shots that the items have already been sent and few days later, I got a mail that my package has arrived, instructing me to call one number being an Emirates airways customer service. I did and was told to pay some money to come pick up my item or have it delivered to my destination. Then I opened up and confronted the guy and he ended the call and barred me from calling him back.
Certainly sounds like a scam to me, let me send you some stuff, here are some nice photos, then you are notified of a package, and all you have to do is pay the bill, then it is all yours, and my guess that the phone number was fake, there was no package waiting, and if you did paid, then that would be it, then the scammers would simply disappear, and this happens more then you think, and some people do fall for the scammer. I heard of an auto scam, as this person was given a great deal on a jeep, and all he had to do is wire some money via western union, and he did, and he never got the jeep of course because it was a scam from the start, and I think this person was in the military, and he should have had common sense.

I have set up a business review section, and a business scam section, so if you run across a good or bad business, then you can visit the appropriate forum section, and leave a review for that business; I will also be setting up some other review sections also, which should become popular over time.
 

NoviceNinja

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#9
According to a research study, I read a few months back. Over a quarter of us will open suspicious links from scam and phishing emails. Most of these are after stealing your hard-earned money by accessing your accounts like PayPal, your online banking credentials and more. People believe that these kinds of scams just come in the forms of emails and pop-ups. However, you can find them in hacked Facebook accounts or links in advertisements too. Stay alert guys!
 
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#10
According to a research study, I read a few months back. Over a quarter of us will open suspicious links from scam and phishing emails. Most of these are after stealing your hard-earned money by accessing your accounts like PayPal, your online banking credentials and more. People believe that these kinds of scams just come in the forms of emails and pop-ups. However, you can find them in hacked Facebook accounts or links in advertisements too. Stay alert guys!
I get such emails all the time saying my PayPal has been frozen, and I never click on them and just completely ignore them, and I never click on links in an email unless I know exactly who sent the email, and why, and it is really rare for me to click on email links unless I am verifying my email. I always assume when I get an email, then 9 out of 10 times then it will either be spam or scam, and they always get filed in my special cabinet: Trash
 

Heatman

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#11
If you are selling or buying ANYTHING online, you need to be on the lookout for internet scammers. These are people who pretend to be selling an item that they do not actually have, or that they want to purchase an item that you are selling.

It always ends up that they get your money and you get nothing. The first examples of internet scammers started several years back with what is called the Nigerian Scam. This involved getting an email from someone who claimed to be a disinherited person from the royal family and they had $35 million dollars ( could be more or less, depending on the email), and they desperately needed to get the money out of the country right away because the government was going to seize it.

They said they picked you because you were a person of great honesty and good character, and they want to send the money to you for safe-keeping, and in return you would receive part of the money; Of course, they wanted all of your bank account information, which some people were fooling enough to give them, and then had their bank accounts wiped out.

One of the more popular ones now is to simply make an advertisement, say for a house for rent, and it shows a picture of a beautiful house and an impossibly low rent. The owner is “out of town”; so you are to drive by and look and then send a deposit for the house if you like it, and they will send you the key.

Another version of that is the expensive purebred dog that is free if you send money for shipping. I am sure that there are a lot more incarnations of this scam. The reverse version of this is when you are advertising something for sale. They offer to purchase it and will send you the money, plus shipping costs, once they have your bank account, address, and other personal information.

Anytime you are buying or selling anything online, it is important to carefully read everything, and if it sounds too good to be true, it very likely is a scam.
If you are too greedy, then you are definitely bound to fall prey to online scammers because greed is what they feed off on. Once you show any sign of greed when dealing with a supposed online scammer, then you have already given the individual a loophole to exploit and before you know what's going on, it would be too late as you would have lost your money to their scheme at that time. My advice when dealing with anyone online especially strangers and even someone whom you used to be but lost contact, is to be very careful when such people brings any kind of business proposition to you.
 
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