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Tips You Should Know Before Becoming a Freelance Professional

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#1
Freelancing has become a very popular way to either earn a full or part-time income and there are several things that you should know before becoming a freelance professional.

Know What You are Capable of Doing?

You need to know what skills you can bring to the table when you want to start freelancing. Are you a good writer? Maybe you are good with programming or graphic design? No matter what skills you have; you need to be confident in them if you want to make money as a freelancer, however, if you can not write, then do not take advantage of other people because you want to be a freelancer but you can not write a proper sentence if your life depended on it. I see far too many want-be freelancers that are offering their skills that are far below what most of us would consider standards; If you do not have what it takes, then so be it, find another path.

Where Will You Find Work

You also need to know the best places to find freelance work in your niche. You will find that there are free websites out there that offer work and there are sites where you have to pay a fee to see the jobs. You need to remember that some websites are legitimate and others are not, so be sure to find a reputable site to find freelance work. If you are not the early bird, then you do not get the worm; It is rare that jobs will simply just jump in your lap while you are watching TV, and you certainly can't get any work done if you are not able to rip yourself from the couch because your favorite show might be on, and that bag of chips you cant put down.


Have Emergency Money

Know that as a freelancer it can take some time to make money. This is why it is important to set up an emergency fund to cover any expenses that you may run into until you start making money at regular intervals, and even when you are making money, then what you are making maybe in some type of escrow until you have completed your job, so you will want to keep this in mind, and make sure you keep reserve funds on hand in case the unexpected may come up, sound good?

Have Patience and Be Willing to Learn

As mentioned above, it will take some time to start bringing in regular money as a freelancer so you need to have a lot of patience to be successful. You also need to be willing to learn so you can improve your skills that you can offer your clients. You should also be open to learning new skills to offer your freelance clients.

Knowing these things before you start a freelance career is going to put you ahead of others that decided to jump right in with no research.
 
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Heatman

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#2
One thing I was thought by the person who introduced me to freelancing is to master patience because it does not some get rich quick scheme. It pays but it comes slow slow unless one is into affiliate marketing and actually know what he or she is doing.

From the first month that I became a freelancer, I was able to be making around $20-$40 on monthly basis, but as I get better on the job, my earnings increased to $70-$100 on monthly basis, and I'm still trying to improve on that.

This article on tips one should know before becoming a freelancer is quite interesting and well written, maybe I would have to still share it with some of my friends and see their responses. Good job @DGStaff .
 
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One thing I was thought by the person who introduced me to freelancing is to master patience because it does not some get rich quick scheme. It pays but it comes slow slow unless one is into affiliate marketing and actually know what he or she is doing.

From the first month that I became a freelancer, I was able to be making around $20-$40 on monthly basis, but as I get better on the job, my earnings increased to $70-$100 on monthly basis, and I'm still trying to improve on that.

This article on tips one should know before becoming a freelancer is quite interesting and well written, maybe I would have to still share it with some of my friends and see their responses. Good job @DGStaff .
No one said that running a business would be an easy task, and this would include freelancing also, and you have to start from the ground and work your way up, and always remember, doing quality work for others will keep you working into the future, however, if your work is not so good, then the only feedback you will get will be negative, then no one will want to do business with you as a freelancer. If you want your inbox flooded with orders, then you always have to deliver your work ASAP, and your quality should be the highest possible, then your customers will start letting others know about your high in-demand skills as a freelancer, and before you know, you may not be able to beat your clients away with a stick, however, if you do bad work, then that will certainly get rid of your clients or customers really fast, then your negative feedback goes viral.
 

Heatman

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#4
No one said that running a business would be an easy task, and this would include freelancing also, and you have to start from the ground and work your way up, and always remember, doing quality work for others will keep you working into the future, however, if your work is not so good, then the only feedback you will get will be negative, then no one will want to do business with you as a freelancer. If you want your inbox flooded with orders, then you always have to deliver your work ASAP, and your quality should be the highest possible, then your customers will start letting others know about your high in-demand skills as a freelancer, and before you know, you may not be able to beat your clients away with a stick, however, if you do bad work, then that will certainly get rid of your clients or customers really fast, then your negative feedback goes viral.
This practically supports the assertion - cause and effect; When one does a good job, then there is definitely going to be a positive assessment which would improve the individual chances of getting more jobs but once it's a bad job, it's certainly going to negatively impact on the job. Personally, as much as one wants as many jobs as possible because it guarantees more pay, and it is better to work for quality over quantity because the former ensures one's job continuity.
 
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Kieranlewix

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#5
Many aspiring freelancers end up quitting before even getting to the starting line because they neglect to follow any of the guidelines you have outlined, @DGStaff . Truth be told, ignorance is to be blamed. By ignorance, I don't mean the 'foolishness' type of definition but rather the more primitive one which is basically being a person who likes to ignore things.

A good example is a person who knows very well that they are terrible at writing but still decides that academic writing in their field of choice. It is no secret that they will fail miserably and soil their reputation. That one poorly done job will have a ripple effect and other than completely destroying their reputation, could get them banned from a site like Fiverr. If in some way they manage to avoid getting kicked out, then no one would ever give them another job. They end up denying themselves a chance to grow and sharpen their skills.
 
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DGStaff

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This practically supports the assertion - cause and effects. When one puts out a good job, there is definitely going to be a positive assessment which would improve the individual chances of getting more jobs but once it's a bad job, it's certainly going to negatively impact on the job. Personally, as much as one wants as many jobs as possible because it guarantees more pay, it's better to work for quality over quantity because the former ensures one's job continuity.
That sounds like a fair statement to me; If I buy a particular brand of food, and it goes not come out good, and it does not matter if I was wrong, or the brand was just terrible, then there is a solid chance that I will never buy that brand again, and why would I buy again, if I feel that it is terrible?

Many aspiring freelancers end up quitting before even getting to the starting line because they neglect to follow any of the guidelines you have outlined, @DGStaff . Truth be told, ignorance is to be blamed. By ignorance, I don't mean the 'foolishness' type of definition but rather the more primitive one which is basically being a person who likes to ignore things.

A good example is a person who knows very well that they are terrible at writing, but still decides that academic writing is their field of choice. It is no secret that they will fail miserably and soil their reputation. That one poorly done job will have a ripple effect and other than completely destroying their reputation, could get them banned from a site like F#@%$r. If in some way they manage to avoid getting kicked out, then no one would ever give them another job. They end up denying themselves a chance to grow and sharpen their skills.
I do not think it is out of ignorance, some of these writers or most, if not all of them know good and well they can not write, nor do they seem to use any free tools that would help them correct their bad grammar, and they are just trying to get another sale, and do not care much about anything else, and they are not worried about past customers using them again as they will focus on those have have never used their service before.
 

Heatman

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#7
That sounds like a fair statement to me; If I buy a particular brand of food, and it goes not come out good, and it does not matter if I was wrong, or the brand was just terrible, then there is a solid chance that I will never buy that brand again, and why would I buy again, if I feel that it is terrible?
I think there is no one in his/her right frame of mind that would buy something that wasn't good enough for him/her twice. That's not a logical thing to do, if a product or service bought/paid for isn't satisfactory, going back to it again is almost an impossible mission.
 

DGStaff

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#8
I think there is no one in his/her right frame of mind that would buy something that wasn't good enough for him/her twice. That's not a logical thing to do, if a product or service bought/paid for isn't satisfactory, going back to it again is almost an impossible mission.
@DigitalGlobal feels that all sellers/vendors that sell physical products should offer some type of refund policy, however, it would be no refunds on digital products since digital products can not be returned or repackaged for resell, and this is why is important for buyers ask questions before they make any type of purchase, as a buyer myself, I tend not to buy new things unless it is a real need, or I have seen a number of reviews. I realize most people want to be satisfied when they buy something, not left with more broken promises, and/or more bad deals, but you cant always please everyone.
 

Heatman

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#9
@DigitalGlobal feels that all sellers/vendors that sell physical products should offer some type of refund policy, however, it would be no refunds on digital products since digital products can not be returned or repackaged for resell, and this is why is important for buyers ask questions before they make any type of purchase, as a buyer myself, I tend not to buy new things unless it is a real need, or I have seen a number of reviews. I realize most people want to be satisfied when they buy something, not left with more broken promises, and/or more bad deals, but you cant always please everyone.
Of course yes, you are correct. Physical products should definitely be made to have provisions for a return especially when there is a justified reason why the product is been returned. But once it's digital products, return is 100% impossible because the nature of digital products doesn't make provision for a return. You mentioned reviews as a good approach to follow before buying any digital products. This is true because it's the only thing that would tell you if such products are worth buying or not. Although we now have some problem with some reviews being bought. How do one differentiate between a real review and a paid review?
 

Kieranlewix

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#10
Of course yes, you are correct. Physical products should definitely be made to have provisions for a return especially when there is a justified reason why the product is been returned. But once it's digital products, return is 100% impossible because the nature of digital products doesn't make provision for a return. You mentioned reviews as a good approach to follow before buying any digital products. This is true because it's the only thing that would tell you if such products are worth buying or not. Although we now have some problem with some reviews being bought. How do one differentiate between a real review and a paid review?
I was once asking myself the same question Heatman, How do I differentiate between a real review and a paid one? When you get so used to looking at reviews, you will figure out a couple things about them. If a review is so shallow, it is most likely fake or doctored. Most paid reviewers write a piece that is long but not so full of useful information. For example, when you are checking Amazon for an affordable stove, and you stumble on the reviews, you will find that some people are saying that the stove is "light", "durable'', "safe", "cheap" etc. but in very long perfect sentences. These are people who have not even seen that stove. However, if you see someone who just left a random comment like "..the stove is good. I once dropped it and nothing happened. It also cooks very fast and saves me lots of kerosene", chances are, that customer is real, because he/she has actually experienced it and from the review, you can see that they were not motivated to even write the piece. They just wrote it shoddily in order to recommend it to other interested people.
 
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I was once asking myself the same question Heatman, How do I differentiate between a real review and a paid one? When you get so used to looking at reviews, you will figure out a couple things about them. If a review is so shallow, it is most likely fake or doctored. Most paid reviewers write a piece that is long but not so full of useful information. For example, when you are checking Amazon for an affordable stove, and you stumble on the reviews, you will find that some people are saying that the stove is "light", "durable'', "safe", "cheap" etc. but in very long perfect sentences. These are people who have not even seen that stove. However, if you see someone who just left a random comment like "..the stove is good. I once dropped it and nothing happened. It also cooks very fast and saves me lots of kerosene", chances are, that customer is real, because he/she has actually experienced it and from the review, you can see that they were not motivated to even write the piece. They just wrote it shoddily in order to recommend it to other interested people.
Sounds something similar to paid blog comments, and you read the comments on a blog, then it is not hard to tell who is being honest and genuine
compared to a blog comment that is generic in nature, something like, love your blog, very good information, which does not show engagement, and when you run across a site where all the comments or reviews look generic, then you can bet that the site is full of spam, not so good for the site.
 

Heatman

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#12
I was once asking myself the same question Heatman, How do I differentiate between a real review and a paid one? When you get so used to looking at reviews, you will figure out a couple things about them. If a review is so shallow, it is most likely fake or doctored. Most paid reviewers write a piece that is long but not so full of useful information. For example, when you are checking Amazon for an affordable stove, and you stumble on the reviews, you will find that some people are saying that the stove is "light", "durable'', "safe", "cheap" etc. but in very long perfect sentences. These are people who have not even seen that stove. However, if you see someone who just left a random comment like "..the stove is good. I once dropped it and nothing happened. It also cooks very fast and saves me lots of kerosene", chances are, that customer is real, because he/she has actually experienced it and from the review, you can see that they were not motivated to even write the piece. They just wrote it shoddily in order to recommend it to other interested people.
Now, that is one good way to discern if a review is paid for or real from an actual user of the product. This is one of the problems we have today in our society, people would do almost anything and everything to get paid, and lying over a review is the least of what some people can do.

But just like you pointed out, it's best to try and pick out the feelings of the writer when reading the review. A paid reviewer would most likely be shallow and awfully trying to over impress with his words. This is one good way to point out that such reviews aren't real. Good suggestions @Kieranlewix.
 

Kieranlewix

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#13
@DigitalGlobal feels that all sellers/vendors that sell physical products should offer some type of refund policy, however, it would be no refunds on digital products since digital products can not be returned or repackaged for resell, and this is why is important for buyers ask questions before they make any type of purchase, as a buyer myself, I tend not to buy new things unless it is a real need, or I have seen a number of reviews. I realize most people want to be satisfied when they buy something, not left with more broken promises, and/or more bad deals, but you cant always please everyone.
It is already difficult to offer a return policy for physical goods; I would imagine that digital goods are impossible to return. There was a friend of mine who bought a laptop from Jumia. She is not the kind of person who knows much about computers, so she did not really care about the specs. When the laptop was delivered, she tried to partition her disk and that's when she realised that her local disk's capacity was 250GB. She knew that most computers had 500GB memory but hers didn't. She tried to return it but Jumia would not accept that. My point is that physical goods are already a pain, I would imagine returning a digital product like an eBook would be useless. For a customer to realise that they bought the wrong eBook, they have to open it, and that means downloading it, so there wouldn't be any point of returning it. In the end, if the seller has already sent the eBook via email, then returning the buyer's money would be robbing himself because the buyer would still remain with the product.
 
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#14
It is already difficult to offer a return policy for physical goods; I would imagine that digital goods are impossible to return. There was a friend of mine who bought a laptop from Jumia. She is not the kind of person who knows much about computers, so she did not really care about the specs. When the laptop was delivered, she tried to partition her disk and that's when she realised that her local disk's capacity was 250GB. She knew that most computers had 500GB memory but hers didn't. She tried to return it but Jumia would not accept that. My point is that physical goods are already a pain, I would imagine returning a digital product like an eBook would be useless. For a customer to realise that they bought the wrong eBook, they have to open it, and that means downloading it, so there wouldn't be any point of returning it. In the end, if the seller has already sent the eBook via email, then returning the buyer's money would be robbing himself because the buyer would still remain with the product.
If you want to be a seller, and you sell physical products, then you need to have some sort of return policy, and if you do not, then could reflect badly on the seller by not having a return policy, and if people do not trust the seller, then no one is going to buy from the seller, and you are right, returns can be a pain in the ass, however, if you want to build trust as a seller, then you really should have a return policy in place for the customer to return products they may not like or even return defective products, as for digital products, then there would be no return policy as they cant be returned.
 

Hova

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#15
Of course you must have a portfolio because how else are going to get jobs, right? This is where clients will be lookingto see what kind of work you will be taking on and the work can consist of past client work or even personal work.
 

DGStaff

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#16
Of course you must have a portfolio because how else are going to get jobs, right? This is where clients will be lookingto see what kind of work you will be taking on and the work can consist of past client work or even personal work.
absolutely, @DigitalGlobal will look at your profile very hard before doing business with you, and I would do the same thing because people always claim they can do things that they really can not do, and the buying experience can be very bad if the work is not as described. If you say you can do SEO tasks, then do not expect DG to do business with you until he has reviewed your current, and past work by looking at your portfolio and reviews.
 

KellyGeo

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#17
The first lesson anyone looking to become a freelance writer must have at the back of his or her mind is that patience is a virtue. Starting off as a freelancer never pays quick money nor will make one rich overnight. It takes time and patience to be able to earn money online, one has got to be committed and dedicated to the job especially if you are working on paid to post sites as well as survey sites. Also trying to be sure where you are going to get jobs to do is very important because there are several scam sites online and it would be a shame to waste your time working on a site that wouldn't pay you.
 
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