Why Should I Become A Freelancer?

DGStaff

DG Staff
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#21
Being a freelancer is a good feeling, it pays as long as you are good in what you do. But I seriously wouldn't encourage one being a full time freelancer. It's good to have other physical job to supplement one's earnings as a freelancer, it's the only way I see one being able to take care of all his financial responsibilities. Money made from being a freelancer wouldn't be enough to take care of my needs personally, so it's the reason why I work as a part time freelancer and take up other jobs.
thats right, and you should not quit the job you have to become a freelancer unless you are just that popular; When you go to work each day, then you know exactly how much you are getting paid, and when you will be getting paid, as for a freelancer, then you may go through dry spells, and unless you are that popular freelancer that everyone wants to work with, then you really don't know when that next order will be coming as people are often unpredictable, and emotional, so orders could be coming in daily, even then, those orders are not guaranteed, and could stop coming at any time.
 

to7update

Well-known member
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#22
That conversation can go both ways, the freelance market may be oversaturated, but there are also a lot of freelancers that cost an arm and a leg, and this depends if they have any spots available as they are so high in depending, and availability may not come open that often, and people will know if they got a good freelancer or not, and if they get ahold of a solid freelancer that they are looking for, then they may not want to let go until they are done, and if the freelancer does on-going freelance work, then you could be waiting several months for a spot just to come open.
It's very much true what you say. In F#@%$r I've seen "top" freelancers with dozens and dozens of testimonies from people who have hired them, who I am sure can make a full time living out of it. So, for the freelancer, it's not just about having the skills, but seizing the opportunity of making a name, to earn the trust from employers, and get more jobs.
 

DGStaff

DG Staff
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8,110
#23
It's very much true what you say. In F#@%$r I've seen "top" freelancers with dozens and dozens of testimonies from people who have hired them, who I am sure can make a full time living out of it. So, for the freelancer, it's not just about having the skills, but seizing the opportunity of making a name, to earn the trust from employers, and get more jobs.
sure, if you sell crap to buyers, then they will not come back and buy more, and if that is not bad enough, then they will go around leaving bad reviews on the bad service that you provided them, and it is far easier for someone to give you a bad review, and more difficult to get good reviews.
 

Kieranlewix

Well-known member
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#24
This is the reason I don't really like sites like F#@%$r and Freelancer. The chances of actually scoring a gig are very slim due to the over performing freelancers that have already established themselves. A new freelancer may have to queue for so long to even get a chance to showcase their skill. It is better to opt for sites that specialize in a specific area e.g Iwriter which is only for writers and clients. Here, you stand a better chance, though you are not assured of a job either.
That conversation can go both ways, the freelance market may be oversaturated, but there are also a lot of freelancers that cost an arm and a leg, and this depends if they have any spots available as they are so high in depending, and availability may not come open that often, and people will know if they got a good freelancer or not, and if they get ahold of a solid freelancer that they are looking for, then they may not want to let go until they are done, and if the freelancer does on-going freelance work, then you could be waiting several months for a spot just to come open.
 

DGStaff

DG Staff
Staff member
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8,110
#25
This is the reason I don't really like sites like F#@%$r and Freelancer. The chances of actually scoring a gig are very slim due to the over performing freelancers that have already established themselves. A new freelancer may have to queue for so long to even get a chance to showcase their skill. It is better to opt for sites that specialize in a specific area e.g Iwriter which is only for writers and clients. Here, you stand a better chance, though you are not assured of a job either.
DG has been keen and shown some interest in adding freelance categories to the marketplace, however, it would take 100+ hours of additional coding, and I am sure he would not do this until the marketplace is underway, and would be able to support an even more expensive addon; Right now, the marketplace platforum can support digital downloads, and physical products, but does not currently support freelancers per say, and this would have to be added in the future if freelancers want to promote their products and services in the marketplace, so we will see what happens.
 

NoviceNinja

Well-known member
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50
#26
You are right, my friend. It is really hard to be involved in freelance life, especially when you are a newbie, it's hard to find costumers who are willing risk their money in a newbie, they would rather choose the freelancers who have a lot more experience.
I agree, but everyone had started at some point. Just like forum posting, you tend to have mistakes along the way, but in time you get better.

If you are new, do your very best to make your profile stand out and not focus on things that you can do. Instead, audit your skills that might be beneficial for them and make the CEO realize that if they hire you, you would be a valuable asset for the organization, with or without experience.
 

DGStaff

DG Staff
Staff member
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8,110
#27
I agree, but everyone had started at some point. Just like forum posting, you tend to have mistakes along the way, but in time you get better.

If you are new, do your very best to make your profile stand out and not focus on things that you can do. Instead, audit your skills that might be beneficial for them and make the CEO realize that if they hire you, you would be a valuable asset for the organization, with or without experience.
a CEO of a business normally does not have anything to do with the hiring process, and this would be left up to Human Resources (HR) however, if the person being hired is upper management, then the CEO could be involved in the process to some degree, but if you are just a one-man show, then I guess you would be considered the CEO, and therefore, you would be completely involved on who you are bringing into your business.
 
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